LISA RENEE: “Relax, Fight-Flight and Freeze”

When we understand how fear is created in the body, it is helpful in releasing the grip of anxiety and fear patterns. This is basic information on how the body’s physiology is affected by fear and trauma and how that is exploited by dark forces.

Our biology has three distinctly different processors of energy and information, two conscious and one functioning below radar. We are aware of our thoughts and emotions, but we are less aware of what the survival brain is doing, and how this is affecting the way we feel.

The survival brain is the one that takes your hand off the stove, before the other two brains realize that you have burned your hand. It is incredibly fast at responding to what is happening in our environment, in order to keep the body safe. It’s like each human body comes with a pre-loaded software program that says keep this body alive. So what is going on in the lower brain, below conscious radar?

Software: Survival Programs

The lower brain basically runs in three modes: relaxed, fight-flight, and freeze. Again to keep it very simple, using a stoplight as a model. (from Stephen Porges, Poly-vagal Theory).

Traffic Light Danger

When we are in green, we are relaxed our heart and respiration are slow, we can digest our food, we can nap, we enjoy being with loved ones and can relate to them. The moment the lower brain feels there is danger; it moves the biology into yellow. The vagus nerve shuts down all the organs below the diaphragm, and speeds up the ones above the diaphragm. We get an immediate increase of available energy, or superhuman strength, enough to lift a small car off of a child. This is an amazing thing the body can do in a split second. Our bodies were designed to do this for very brief period. We don’t want to get stuck in yellow, where we cannot digest our food, we cannot sleep, and we cannot enjoy or relate to our loved ones. There are usually two reasons we get stuck in fight-flight. We are living in an unsafe situation and the accurate assessment is that we are in danger. Or we have an unresolved Trauma from the past, which the lower brain feels is happening now, in the present moment.

Being in the Red zone is more rare. This is where the lower brain perceives that the body is not going to survive the experience and shuts it down. The body becomes immobilized to play dead, anesthetized to minimize suffering, and the consciousness often leaves the body or is disassociated from it. Again, this is an amazing biological accomplishment in a split second. We see this with high impacts, with early and chronic abuse such as SRA, and in war and torture. The eyes are vacant the voice is monotone and the body is lifelessly still, meaning there is no fidgeting or normal movement in the body. [1]

Creating Conditions

The issue with the survival brain is that we cannot fake it out. If we want to relax, we actually have to create the conditions for the physiology to move into green. If we live with a predator, if we work under a predator, if we do not have our basics needs met, we are going to be in yellow. So part of being able to clear fear means making choices that help the Brain and nervous system register that we are safe.

Self-Assessing

Since our human family is now living in the yellow zone so much of the time, let’s look more closely at the spectrum of yellow, and the difference between fight and flight. We are looking at increasing levels of activation in the nervous system. On a scale of 1-10, we can have low-level activation, which is a feeling of unease on the flight side and irritability on the fight side. In the mid-range, we have anxiety on the flight side and anger on the fight side. At the high end we have rage and panic, which are getting closer to the threshold where the body switches into freeze or red.

During Stress, Back to the Basics

This information is shared from the perspective that if we can identify when our nervous systems is tweaked and our physiology has shifted into fight flight, we can take the necessary steps to shift out of it. Being better informed gives us more choices in how we respond. When we find ourselves stressed out it is important to slow down, and create the conditions for the lower brain to assess that we are actually safe again. This releases the physiology from hyper arousal, and allows the body to relax again or get back to green. Starseeds nervous systems are highly sensitive and run a lot of frequency and may benefit from some extra supplementation. When the nervous system is feeling fried creating some peace and quiet in order to recharge is so helpful. If the body is stuck in yellow, it burns up the bodies resources more quickly. So we are best served by taking some time out to create the conditions to get back to green. If you notice you are triggered or activated, slow down and ask your self what just happened? What was the trigger? If you can’t connect it to something conscious, consider that it is connected to implicit-memory, a data packet from another timeline. Treat it the same, work to clearing associated fear, pain and trauma from the hard drive. [2]

 

References:

  1. Overcoming Fear
  2. [Krystal Aegis Booklet, ES Forum Discussion]

See Also:

Overcoming Fear

Bio-Neurology

 

~via Ascension Glossary

JENN GRANNEMAN: “Here’s the Scientific Explanation for Why Introverts Like Being Alone”

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I’m an introvert, so I need plenty of “alone” time. If I don’t get enough, I’m not myself. I feel worn out and cranky. I get short with people, because every little annoyance seems magnified. I want to sneak away and hide for a while.

Spending time alone—reading, writing, or just hanging around my apartment doing nothing—recharges me. It’s like what author Jonathan Rauch writes:

“For introverts, to be alone with our thoughts is as restorative as sleeping, as nourishing as eating.”

Rauch’s own formula is to spend two hours alone recharging for every hour he spends socializing.

Extroverts, on the other hand, actually feel energized when they’re on-the-go or hanging out with others. Many extroverts get restless and bored when they have to be alone for too long. But me? I could spend hours (or days) alone and feel great.

So why do introverts need more alone time than extroverts? The answer is found in the wiring of our brains.

It’s All in Your Head

Our need for alone time has to do with a chemical called dopamine. Both introverts and extroverts have dopamine in their brains, but they respond to it differently.

What is dopamine? It’s a neurotransmitter that helps control your brain’s pleasure and reward centers. It makes us notice opportunities to get external rewards (like money, social status, and sex) and take action to get them.

Imagine you and your extroverted friend are at a bar. You both see an attractive person across the room. Dopamine floods both of your brains as you think about flirting with this person. Your extroverted friend feels a thrilling rush of “happiness hits” from dopamine. But you feel nervous and somewhat overwhelmed. Sound familiar?

This is because extroverts have a more active dopamine reward network than introverts. Basically, they need more dopamine to feel its pleasant effects, explains Dr. Marti Olsen Laney in her book The Introvert Advantage: How Quiet People Can Thrive in an Extrovert World.

For introverts, too much of a good thing really is too much. We feel overstimulated when dopamine floods our brains.

When we spend time alone, we’re not faced with situations like talking to an attractive stranger. Essentially we’re lowering our level of external stimulation. Being alone feels just right for our dopamine-sensitive system.

Acetylcholine Is Where It’s At

Forget dopamine. Introverts would rather bask in another neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, explains Christine Fonseca in her book Quiet Kids: Help Your Introverted Child Succeed in an Extroverted World. Like dopamine, acetylcholine is also linked to pleasure. The difference is, acetylcholine makes us feel good when we turn inward. It powers our abilities to think deeply, reflect, and focus intensely on just one thing for a long period of time.

This helps further explain why introverts like being alone: it’s easier to turn inward when we’re not paying attention to other people.

Let Us Rest and Digest

According to Laney, everyone’s nervous system has two modes: parasympathetic and sympathetic. When we use the parasympathetic side (nicknamed the “rest and digest” side), we feel calm and are focused inwardly. Our body conserves energy and withdraws from the environment; muscles relax, energy is stored, food is metabolized, pupils constrict to reduce light, and our heart rate and blood pressure slow. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine increases blood flow and alertness in the front of the brain.

The sympathetic side is known as the “full-throttle” or “fight, fright, or flight” system. This side mobilizes us toward discovering new things and makes us active, daring, or inquisitive. The brain becomes alert and hyper-focused on its surroundings. Blood sugar and free fatty acids are elevated to give us more energy, and digestion is slowed. Thinking is reduced, and we become prepared to make snap decisions.

Of course, introverts and extroverts use both sides of their nervous system at different times. But just like introverts and extroverts respond differently to dopamine, we prefer different sides of the nervous system. You can probably guess which side introverts prefer: the parasympathetic side.

Are You Getting Enough Alone Time?

It can be hard to get enough alone time. We may feel guilty when we turn down social plans or tell our significant other we want a night to ourselves. However, not getting enough alone time can affect us physically and emotionally. According to Laney, you may not be getting enough alone time if you regularly experience some of these symptoms:

  • Trouble sleeping or eating
  • Frequent colds, headaches, back pains, or allergies
  • Feeling anxious, agitated, irritable, and “snappish”
  • Unable to think, concentrate, or make decisions
  • Confused and discombobulated, as if you are dashing from thing to thing in a blur
  • Trapped and wondering what is the meaning of life
  • Drained, tired, and put-upon
  • Disconnected from yourself

What should you do? Make it a priority to include alone time in your day, even if it’s only a few minutes of catching your breath alone in your car or bedroom. Laney writes, “Many introverts have felt so stigmatized about the private, reserved aspect of their nature that they have not allowed themselves the time to develop effective restorative practices. It’s time to change that!”  retina_favicon1


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