SIMON SEGAL: “Tired Of Being A Negativity Sponge? What You Need To Know To Reclaim Your Energy And Prevent Energy Infiltration”

Everything has a vibration — smells, sounds, colors, objects, animals, people. We are in a continual energetic cycle of communication with everything around us, and what we let to affect us is what we become.

And as much as we have the power to affect the world around us with our energy, sometimes we seemingly lose that ability because our vibration becomes lowered and weaker than the surrounding sources.

In this lowered state, we become negativity sponges. Everybody is looking for a place to dump their negativity because it’s very hard to deal with. And when you become an energy dumpster… well, I don’t have to say too much about it — you are well aware what happens.

The sad truth is that we often choose to lower our vibration for all the wrong purpose. I’m not talking about going against our innate goodness (that is self-explanatory). I am talking about destroying our shield out of goodness.

Although it’s always important to lower your shield when you want to connect with people, we often go a step too far, compromising our energy, and ending up in a messed up energetic state.

So, here’s how to know what is that one step too far and how you can reclaim your vibration.

1. Avoid connecting with people through negative emotion

It may seem like an unavoidable scenario: your friend feels sad, and you match emotions to connect with them — to make them some kind of consolation-company. This way, we even our vibration with theirs to be on the same wavelength, and we thus lower our vibration.

Some may argue that this is very normal and expected from those who are close to you. I’d argue against it, though. It’s true that misery likes company, but this kind of company will never help anyone out.

If you truly hold that person dear, you should offer them a higher vibration so that they can get out of that lowered state. This way, you not only help them, but you also help yourself by not getting down in the dumps. In the end, how can you help someone out if you start suffering from the same problem as them?

2. Some things are not your responsibility — and they shouldn’t be

We all face challenges that are set there to make us grow. These challenges may often feel negative and almost impossible to handle. However, the worst you can do for them is take their responsibility upon yourself.

We often start feeling as if we are supposed to fix other people’s problems simply because they complained about how difficult they were for them. Other times, when we are asked to help, we decide to take one step further and start doing the things they are supposed to and can do.

However, you shouldn’t forget that we all carry our own baggage and we are responsible for it more than for the baggage of others. Giving help doesn’t mean grabbing their bags and pulling them with our teeth because our hands are already full.

No matter how ready you feel to do this, it doesn’t do the other person any good because they won’t learn anything from that challenge — they won’t grow. The better option is to encourage them to use their knowledge and power and face the challenge because they are readier for it than you can imagine.

Nobody needs a problem-solver. We just sometimes need a little push and some encouragement.

3. Substitute compassion for sympathy

Sympathy is a poison. Many people don’t understand this and find me cold-hearted when I say this, although I know how much love I have for this world. And why is it a poison? Because it leads nowhere but in the worst direction.

Sympathy means that you feel sorry for someone’s struggle, and when you feel sorry for them, it means that you don’t believe they are capable of coping with that challenge. Why would you think that? Our ability to tackle the most difficult of challenges is something we are born with.

So, why underestimate the person by feeling sorry for them? Compassion is a much more evolved approach that lets you understand their struggle, accept their position, and empower them (if you can) to overcome the obstacles.

You need to have more trust in the people you love — you need to trust their ability, that requires a simple spark of love and understanding to come to the surface. Compassion is a force that promotes growth and bonding — sympathy is a force that destroys the person before they were given the chance to fight.

4. Don’t be so sure that you know better

A person’s life is such a complex thing that you cannot possibly imagine everything that makes that complexity. So are life situations, in which everyone has their smart opinion — until they are faced with one too.

I have never asked for a piece of someone else’s mind on things that are happening to me. Do you know why? It takes a lot more than words for me to explain everything that is part of that problem, and I don’t see why this would be anything different from you or the next person.

And no matter how much you know about someone’s problem, they will always know one thing more. Which means, no matter how good your advice is, no matter how better you think you know — your advice will most often be a dead end for them.

Why a dead end? Because they didn’t act the way they would and listened to you. Being true to yourself and to your nature is the most important thing. Every mistake I have made because it was my decision has been better than the seemingly ‘best things’ I’ve done under other people’s instruction.

So, no, you can’t know better. Allow the person to act as they naturally would.

5. Never take sides

Oftentimes people we know get into a quarrel and try to put is in the middle by making us choose sides. They try to achieve dominance in numbers and don’t really care about your opinion, which can be felt clearly.

In most of the scenarios, you simply want to be objective and rational, so as to help your, say, friends, to overcome the communication problem and make up.

However, bias, pressure, and thinking that we know it all make us jump in the middle and become bombarded by two clashing sources of negative energy. In the end, you don’t help in any way and end up feeling drained and guilty that you stepped in, in the first place.

And really, why should you take sides in a problem that isn’t yours? Instead of choosing the sides of the story, you should embrace them and accept that people need to solve their differences without your meddling.

6. Never become a people pleaser (and if you are, start saying NO)

I have yet to learn to say NO to some situations, as all of us empaths have that people-pleasing gene that is screwing us over. But really, putting others in front of you may feel rewarding and selfless, although it’s actually ridiculous and those others usually know it.

If everyone acted this way, we would live in a Utopia, I suppose. The truth, though, is that it’s impossible because we were simply born in our own skin, not that of the others — which means we need to start from ourselves.

Putting others before yourself and giving your energy away like you won it off in a casino is a self-betrayal that people won’t appreciate in you, no matter how much you hope that you’ll be appreciated for it.

A better option is to always ask yourself: ‘Can that person do that themselves?’ ‘Can that person wait?’ ‘Do I have to do something related to my life first?’ Even mothers shouldn’t bend to every of their children’s ideas and wishes, right? Why should you?

7. Mind your own business

It’s our eternal pain to learn what others think of us. Many have started revolving their lives around other people’s thoughts and opinions of them. It’s saddening and sickening, really.

I have the reputation of a ‘cold,’ ‘reserved,’ ‘arrogant,’ and whatnot person because I keep my healthy distance and don’t allow people to gobble up my life force and personality. And you know what? I don’t really care. In fact, I’m glad.

Everybody knows me for who I am, and I have never thought twice before saying the things I mean and standing up for myself because I don’t expect anyone else to do it for me.

I know I have an unlimited source of love for this world — but sometimes naughtiness can’t be rewarded with candy, right? Unless it’s cute, I suppose!

The most important thing is that you can’t define your life on the basis of other people’s opinions and thoughts about you. Those who like to judge you for who you are can freely do it, and you can freely not give an f*, because in the end: THAT’S YOU AND YOU SHOULDN’T CHANGE YOURSELF BECAUSE OF ANYONE’S OPINION.

Reclaim your identity, because if you lose it, nobody will be there to find it and bring it back to you. By reclaiming your identity, you reclaim your energy. Respect yourself and respect everyone around you, but know your boundaries.

 

~via ConsciousReminder.com

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JUDITH KUSEL: “The Vibration Of Our Name”

Every time you change your name, you are changing your vibration.

Before birth you soul will telepathically project the name you wish to be known by, to your mother or father. Before my Goddaughter’s son was born, he appeared to me, and told me what he wished to named, and more than this what he will come in to do. His mother, who is a medical doctor, listened and they named him as he had asked to be named, and they immediately guided him from the time he was born, as he had requested. Indeed, they nurtured his inherent genius from birth, and he is blossoming. He is also unusually tall for his age, as he had told me he would be!

Your name and surname are not just random. You knew what your name and surname would be before you incarnated, and accepted it as that.

However, with some families traditional names used for generations are more or less forced upon the parents. Some then resort to nicknames, where they use the name that they would have given the child, if they had free will and choice. However, this confuses the whole issue, for in truth the given names sometimes are not in highest alignment with the soul.

For instance, if women marry and they take on their husband’s surname, their vibration and frequency changes, and they take on the collective ancestral history with the name they take on. Now the more times one marries, and changes one’s name, the more your vibrational frequency changes.

If you are always called by your nickname, or the shortened or pet version of your full name, you never grow into your full maturity. If you assume your full name, you will then start to vibrate to the full power of your name, and thus will vibrate at a much higher frequency.

How can one discern this?

Easy. Ask a group of friends to gather around you, and sing your name(s) with love. For instance, in my case it would be my name, and all the nicknames my family and friends use: Judith, Judi, Jude, Ju (In my case the German pronunciation of my name, differs from the English version, so there immediately a different vibration enters in the way my name is pronounced, and in French even more so). Listen from your heart and soul. Which one resonates the most with you and gives you that special something, which the other versions do not? Remember that if your name was spoken in anger in a certain tone of voice (by parents of whoever) you might have that connotation to that version of your name (more to the TONE) , or you might remember the emotions that went with it. If you name is sung with love, you are tuning into the higher vibration of your name, and that is what you most resonate with.

Since I have insisted that my family and friends use my full name, I have stepped into full maturity and I love my names. All of them.

(Judith Kusel)

 

 

~via http://www.judithkusel.com/

THE OPEN MIND: “Synesthesia — Smelling Colors And Tasting Sounds”

“As music is the color of sound…so is painting the poetry of sight.”

~James McNeil Whistler

 

Do you taste strawberries when you hear the sound of a guitar?  Are you convinced that Fridays are Yellow?  When you see the number 7 do you see it in Light blue?  Approximately 2%–4% of the population has some form of synesthesia, perhaps you do, too!

What Is Synesthesia?

Synesthesia is a perceptual condition in which one sense (for example, hearing) is simultaneously perceived as if by one or more additional senses such as sight.  Another form of synesthesia joins objects such as letters, numbers or shapes with a sensory perception such as smell, color or flavor.

Synesthesia can involve any of the senses.  The most common form, colored letters and numbers, occurs when someone always sees a certain color in response to a certain letter of the alphabet or number.  For example, seeing the word “dog” as forest green or the number “9″ as light purple .  There are also synesthetes who hear sounds in response to smell, who smell in response to touch, or who feel something in response to sight, some even taste sound.  Just about any combination of the senses is possible.

Scientists hypothesize that in synesthetes, neurons and synapses that are “supposed” to be contained within one sensory system cross to another sensory system.  It is unclear why this might happen but some researchers believe that these crossed connections are present in everyone at birth, and only later are the connections refined.  In some studies, infants respond to sensory stimuli in a way that researchers think may involve synesthetic perceptions.  It is hypothesized by these researchers that many children have crossed connections and later lose them.  Adult synesthetes may have simply retained these crossed connections.

Some People Really Can Taste The Rainbow

We’ve covered this phenomenon in the past.  And I’m a synesthete myself — I see letters and numbers in color, and associate sounds with shapes and textures.  But only a very few people — maybe only 1 percent of synesthetes — have sensory crossovers that affect their relationship with food and drink.

Jaime Smith is one of those people.  He’s a sommelier by trade, and he has a rare gift: He smells in colors and shapes.

For Smith, who lives in Las Vegas, a white wine like Nosiola has a “beautiful aquamarine, flowy, kind of wavy color to it.”  Other smells also elicit three-dimensional textures and colors on what he describes as a “projector” in his mind’s eye.

This “added dimension,” Smith says, enhances his ability to appraise and analyze wines. “I feel that I have an advantage over a lot of people, particularly in a field where you’re judged on how good of a smeller you are,” he says.

Atlanta-based pastry chef Taria Camerino also has synesthesia.  But for her, synesthesia is more than just an advantage — it’s a necessity.

Camerino experiences the world through taste.  She tastes music, colors, shapes and even people’s emotions.  She says she has a hard time remembering what things look or sound like, but she can immediately identify objects based on their synesthetic flavors.

“I don’t know what a box looks like unless it’s in front of me.  I don’t know what the color green looks like.  But I know what green tastes like,” she says.

“I don’t know what the color green looks like.  But I know what green tastes like.”

~Taria Camarino

 

In addition to working as a pastry chef, Camerino is often asked by clients to make dishes that mimic her synesthetic experiences.  She creates “flavor profiles” of things like satisfaction and discontent.  She takes inspiration from music to put together nine-course tastings.

“I move through the world this way all the time,” she explains.  “If I want someone to understand it, I have to create a dish out of it.  I have to make it palatable.”

Diagnosis

Although there is no officially established method of diagnosing synesthesia, some guidelines have been developed by Richard Cytowic, MD, a leading synesthesia researcher.  Not everyone agrees on these standards, but they provide a starting point for diagnosis.

Synesthetes do not actively think about their perceptions; they just happen.  Rather than experiencing something in the “mind’s eye,” as might happen when you are asked to imagine a color, a synesthete often actually sees a color projected outside of the body.

The perception must be the same every time; for example, if you taste chocolate when you hear Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, you must always taste chocolate when you hear it; also, the perception must be generic — that is, you may see colors or lines or shapes in response to a certain smell, but you would not see something complex such as a room with people and furniture and pictures on the wall.

Often, the secondary synesthetic perception is remembered better than the primary perception; for example, a synesthete who always associates the color purple with the name “Laura” will often remember that a woman’s name is purple rather than actually remembering “Laura.”

A select group of synesthetes can truly “taste the rainbow.”

According to researcher Sean Day, approximately one in 27 people has some form of synesthesia.

A synesthete himself, Sean Day is president of the American Synesthesia Association and has been tracking research on this condition for more than three decades.

Summarizing the state of current research, Day says the brains of synesthetes do appear to be anatomically different (although he cautions that scientists have only studied a few types of synesthesia so far).

In particular, it seems that the neural connections between different sensory parts of the brain are more myelinated in people with synesthesia.  Myelin is a fatty sheath that surrounds neurons and enables neural signals to travel more quickly.

“Because the myelination is different, the interaction between certain parts of the brain is different,” explains Day.  “This allows parts of the brain that are responsible for different senses to communicate when they normally wouldn’t.”

Hypermyelination could explain why synesthetic experiences seem so real for people like British IT consultant James Wannerton, who is also the president of the UK Synaesthesia Association.

Wannerton has a particularly intrusive form of synesthesia, in which sounds, words and colors all have taste and texture.

“It’s like having an eyedropper of taste sort of dripped on your tongue constantly, just one after another after another,” he explains.  “It’s a full mouth feel. It’s exactly like I’m eating something.”

Even Wannerton’s brain gets fooled.

“I wouldn’t know what a hunger pang is because I don’t get hungry,” he says.  “My brain is constantly pumping acids into my stomach to dissolve food that isn’t there.”

Synesthesia affects his social life, too.  Eating out, for example, is a nightmare:

“Different voices, the ambient atmosphere in the restaurant, it all makes a difference to my experience,” says Wannerton.  “You serve me food on a blue plate — it just totally messes up the eating sensation.”

But even though his synesthesia can be quite disruptive at times (it’s “absolutely ludicrous,” he admits), at the end of the day, Wannerton still enjoys it.

And most synesthetes would agree, including sommelier Jaime Smith.

“My synthie thing is the added bonus for me,” he says.

“It’s the joy and sometimes the fun of it all.”

 

 

~via The-Open-Mind.com