DEJAN DAVCEVSKI: “The 3 Best Mental Tools You Already Have That Will Help You Build A Better Life”

Most of us know how we want to live. We know exactly what we need to do, maybe even how, and yet less than 1% of the people are living on their terms. Why is this?

The short answer is that people lack proper education, nobody has told them that there are mental tools they can learn to use, nobody has showed them how.

Just like you need tools to build, for example a house, you need mental tools to build the reality you want to live in.

There are countless mental tools developed by people who were in desperate need of them. These people needed these tools so much that they created them to help themselves.

Before you go out exploring all the existing mental tools, here are the 3 best and most essential ones you will need to create a better life for yourself.

The 3 Best Mental Tools To Build Better Life:

 

1. The 5 Second Rule.

Most of you know “The 5 Second Rule” to be something that applies to food that you might have dropped. But this is a different rule.

This is a mental tool developed by TV host, author and motivational speaker Mel Robbins and it’s the main thing that helped her rise even higher when she was hitting rock bottom.

This so called “5 Second Rule” is really simple. All it means is that whenever you want, or need, or should do something, count from 5 to 1 and lift off into action.

Mel first started using this mental tool in the mornings, when she felt like not getting out of bed. She started counting 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, and on 1, without thinking, she just got up.

The truth is, you will never going to feel like it’s the perfect moment for taking action. However, with this simple tool you will have mental leverage to launch yourself into action.

2. Turn ANTs Into PETs.

So, of course, we are not talking about actual ants. ANT is short for Automatic Negative Thoughts and PET is short for Positive Encouraging Thoughts.

Dr. Daniel G. Amen got the idea when his home was infested with ants. He looked at the real ants and realized that most people have minds that are infested with negative thoughts.

Most of us think the same 90% of the thoughts every day, and most of these thoughts are negative. There are over 20 mental distortions that twist our reality to seem more negative.

There is an easy tool that Dr. Daniel developed, to turn ANTs into PETs, and it’s in a form of asking yourself 5 simple questions whenever you notice a negative thought.

Is the negative thought true? Can I absolutely know that it is true? How do I react when I feel this thought? Who would I be without this thought? What’s the opposite thought?

3. What’s Pulling, What’s Pushing?

If you are like most of us, you have had a dilemma when you didn’t know what to choose between two or more choices. Most of us have such dilemmas daily.

And this is normal. However, most people don’t really know how to choose the best out of all their conflicting options.

There is a simple mental tool you can use, in a form of 2 simple questions that will clarify so many things for you.

Whenever in a dilemma between two choices ask yourself “What’s pulling me in that direction, love or fear, abundance or scarcity?”

Now ask yourself “What’s pushing me in the opposite direction, love or fear, abundance or scarcity?” Choose the options that are inspired by abundance and love.

 

~via LifeCoachCode.com

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CAITLIN JOHNSTONE: “Fight The Establishment’s Narratives — By Getting Clear On Your Own”

“Scientific research has found that astronauts suffer problems with coordination, perception and cognition when they are unable to determine ‘which way is up’ in space. There is no ‘up’ or ‘down’ when you’re outside the gravitational pull that our bodies are adapted to, so its absence sends our whole system out of whack. Navigating a society that is made of mental narrative is very much the same; if you don’t know which way’s up, you’ll get lost and confused.”

~Caitlin Johnstone

 

Anti-establishment movements are a mess. Whether they’re left-wing or right-wing, whether they’re statist or anarchist, whether they’re organized or decentralized, whether they place emphasis on official or unofficial narratives, any circle of people who are interested in opposing the status quo on a deep, meaningful level almost invariably find themselves significantly bogged down by confusion, paranoia, infighting, and misdirected use of energy.

Every day, for example, I get people in my inbox and social media notifications telling me I shouldn’t quote or share anything from this or that lefty journalist or anti-establishment figure because they’ve said something “problematic” at some point or have some kind of association with some aspect of the establishment. Rather than simply using narrative-disrupting tools wherever they come from to fight the establishment narrative control machine, I’m encouraged to isolate myself to the extremely narrow spectrum of voices which agree with my exact worldview perfectly. This kind of paranoid, self-cannibalizing mentality is rife throughout most anti-establishment circles.

This happens for a number of reasons, including the fact that the ruling power establishment will infiltrate dissident movements that it perceives as a threat with the intent of sowing confusion and division. But the underlying reason anti-establishment circles so often find themselves getting crushed by their own weight is ultimately because life itself is confusing and difficult to understand.

Hardly anyone holds a lucid and steady awareness of just how much of society is comprised of mental narrative. Most people live their lives under the unquestioned assumption that when they are moving around in the world, speaking, acting, forming opinions, having ideas etc, they are interacting with something that resembles objective reality. The truth of the matter is that most of the things which draw people’s attention in their day-to-day experience, whether it’s names, titles, news stories, political parties, economics, history, philosophy, religion or what have you, consist entirely of mental noises firing off inside human skulls.

You might think it’s a big jump to go from chatting about the sociopolitical dynamics within dissident movements to making vaguely Buddhist-sounding observations about human thought, but it’s really not. The reason our species is in a mess right now, and thus the reason movements exist which seek to change the status quo, is because so much of life is dictated entirely by made-up mental narratives which can be easily controlled by the powerful, and hardly anyone fully grasps this. If they did, the revolution against the establishment would very smoothly and quickly succeed.

Scientific research has found that astronauts suffer problems with coordination, perception and cognition when they are unable to determine which way is up in space. There is no “up” or “down” when you’re outside the gravitational pull that our bodies are adapted to, so its absence sends our whole system out of whack. Navigating a society that is made of mental narrative is very much the same; if you don’t know which way’s up, you’ll get lost and confused. Before you can see the narrative matrix clearly, you might be aware that some narratives serve power and swat at them while you’re spinning through space, but you won’t have any solid ground on which to orient yourself for the purpose of forming a clear path forward toward a healthy and harmonious world.

Your first and foremost task as a revolutionary, therefore, is to find solid ground on which to plant your feet while operating within a swirling sea of narratives and counter-narratives. Without this you’ll find yourself expending energy on ineffectual agendas, chasing shadows, attacking friends and advancing the interests of the enemy as you stumble around trying to fight a threat you can’t even see clearly. You’ve got to figure out for yourself which way’s up.

The only way to do this is to turn inward and sort out your own mental narratives in your own experience. This takes a lot of dedicated work, because there are many layers of tightly believed narratives which dictate one’s perception of the world that most people aren’t even aware of.

As soon as we’re born we are given a name which has nothing to do with the nature of the slimy, screaming naked creature which came roaring thunderously alive out of the womb. We spend our childhood being told who we are in various ways by our family, then we go to school to get taught how to think like everyone else and get labeled good/smart or bad/stupid for the rest of our lives based on how well we dance that dance. Along the ride we pick up coping mechanisms to deal with the stress of this whole unnatural ordeal, many of which become extremely counterproductive unconscious habits in later years. We pick up likes and dislikes, interests and aversions, life philosophies, religious beliefs, societal beliefs, political beliefs, all of which come together to form our worldview.

Because the foundations of our entire worldview are formed in early childhood long before we’re mature enough to decide for ourselves what a useful foundation might look like, we wind up interfacing with life through this muddled, inefficient network of mostly unconscious mental and perceptual habits which don’t serve us very well. It is with this warped, endarkened tool that we interact with the vast sea of official and unofficial narratives we are presented with in our attempts to decipher what’s wrong with the world and how to fix it.

The path, then, is to unwind this whole confused, unconscious muddle of mental and perceptual habits until we get to the untarnished blank canvass of that powerful screaming baby who first met this wild world, and inhabit it consciously. That right there is our solid ground.

Who are you? Underneath the mental narratives about who you are? Underneath all the stories, labels and beliefs? Underneath the field of consciousness full of thoughts, sensory impressions and feelings? This is the most important inquiry that anyone can possibly engage in, and it is worthy of the entirety of your focus until it’s resolved.

All of these swirling, babbling thought stories have dictated our lives for as long as we can remember, but rarely does anyone sit down and start sorting out where they come from and if they’re useful. We lug around ancient mental narratives about life, about how we should be, about how other people should be, about the best ways to find happiness, about the best ways to avoid unhappiness, and we rarely consider the possibility that we can interact with life unencumbered by that heavy load.

If you want to find solid ground beneath your feet so that you can push effectively for a healthy world, you’ve got to question every assumption you’ve ever made about yourself and the nature of the world, even your very most fundamental assumptions, because it’s all narrative. As you turn your attention toward your essential nature and away from your churning, babbling mental habits, interest and attention will move away from mental narratives and toward the solid ground upon which they appear. The mind will relax and mental narrative will take on its proper role as a tool that can be used when it’s useful and set down when it isn’t, rather than the dominating feature of every minute of waking existence. Unhelpful mental habits can be discarded, and all attempts at narrative manipulation will stand out like a black fly on a white sheet of paper.

I can’t tell you how to do this. Everyone’s path to the heart of the fundamental matter is unique, and you can only travel it on your own. I can tell you that the answer does not exist in the realm of thought, and that it is closer to you than your own breath. Sincere, dedicated inquiry into your own true nature, on your own and in your own way, will lead you to the ground on which you must take your stand in order to fight the establishment narrative machine effectively.

 

~via CaitlinJohnstone.com

MATEO SOL: “7 Gut Instincts You Should NEVER Ignore”

In order to fulfill your spiritual purpose in this life, you’ve got to walk the path less traveled.

And to walk the path less traveled, you have to embrace your inner wolf.

It is your inner wolf that will guard, guide, and protect you with courage, integrity, and intelligence.

But here’s the thing: in order to embrace your inner wolf, you’ve got to listen to your gut instinct.

The problem is that our gut instincts are often polluted by fears, prejudice, and mental clutter.

In this article, I want to share with you the seven gut instincts you should never ignore. You’ll also learn how to differentiate the voice of fear from the voice of primal wisdom.

What is the Gut Instinct?

Your gut instinct is the physical reaction you have to the world around and inside of you.

When you experience an overwhelming “gut feeling,” your body is carrying out a primal response to subconscious information. The ultimate purpose of your gut instinct is to protect you. As your gut instinct is the most ancient and primal “sixth sense” you have, it is the one you can rely upon the most.

One example of your gut instinct in action would be deciding to spontaneously avoid walking down a road at night because something “feels off.” That feeling is your gut instinct warning you that danger is afoot. You may then glimpse an intimidating gang of men down the street as you hurry by — your gut instinct has just saved you from potentially being robbed, beaten up, raped, or worse.

How Does Gut Instinct Work? (and Why You’re an Animal)

Put simply, your body is like the television screen on which your subconscious (the radio waves) transmits its information. When you can learn to read your body, you can learn to accurately tune in to your gut instinct.

We human beings like to believe ourselves to be separate from animals. Yes, we might be more sophisticated. But at our core, we are still animals — human animals. Our primal impulses and evolutionary origins don’t just disappear because we sit and read the newspaper each morning or wipe our asses with lavender-scented toilet paper.

As noted by anthropologist Clifford Geertz:

… man is an animal suspended in webs of significance he himself has spun.

Rather than get hoity-toity about the fact that we’re only really advanced animals, why not embrace it? By honoring the wisdom of the subconscious mind and its impact on the body to produce ‘gut instinct’ we can save ourselves from a lot of suffering. (This has been proven by the way.)

What’s the Difference Between Gut Instinct and Intuition?

Gut instinct and intuition are often used synonymously. And, yes, they are interconnected. But they aren’t quite the same.

So what’s the difference?

Put simply, gut instinct is your primal wisdom. Intuition is your spiritual wisdom. We need both if we are to walk our spiritual paths with courage and intelligence.

Intuition is very cerebral — it is a calm and clear sense of “knowing.” On the other hand, gut instinct is very visceral and physical — you feel it in your body.

Intuition can be expressed through the body, and the gut instinct can be expressed through intuitive knowing. But generally, both are clearly discernable and strikingly different in their experience.

Also, gut instinct is much more emotional and reactive (as it is wired in the primal brain), whereas intuition is more neutral and calm.

Examples of Gut Instinct

Some call it a “hunch,” others an “inkling,” but in this article, we’ll refer to it as the gut instinct. Here are some examples that are taken from the animal kingdom and human (animal) behavior of gut instinct:

  • A herd of zebra sense danger while grazing. They cannot see the lions lurking in the surrounding savannah, but something is distinctly “off.” One zebra whinnies and the herd begins galloping away vigorously.
  • A herd of elephants meander through the deserts in search of water. Instinctively they know what direction to move in to find their sustenance.
  • A cat sits on the edge of a three-story house and wants to find a way down. She slinks over to the edge and stares at the ground apparently about to jump — but then changes her mind. She climbs down to the first story roof and then makes the jump, apparently aware on an instinctual level that jumping from any higher distance would injure her.
  • A person approaches you at a bar wanting to flirt with you. You start reciprocating, but something feels wrong. You sense a predatory quality about this person. You don’t trust them. You excuse yourself and leave.
  • Two hikers get lost on a trail within the mountains. Without a compass or any way to determine a direction back to camp, they sit silently and tune into the surrounding trees. Suddenly one of them points to the west, “I have a feeling that is the way back!” An hour later they have made it back to home base.
  • You’re driving down a highway at night. Suddenly, the impulse overtakes you to change lanes immediately. You obey the impulse, and a couple of seconds later miss a large spike of glass that could have punctured your tire and rendered you stranded on the side of the road.
  • A young woman is sitting in class at college. Out of the blue, she feels the strange impulse to return home. She ditches the class and catches a taxi, a pit of dread looming in her stomach. When she arrives home, she finds her mother on the floor having a heart attack. If she had ignored her gut instinct, her mother would have most likely died alone.
  • A man has two job offers. One of them pays less, and the other pays more. Logically he would choose the job that pays more, but he can’t shake the knot of dread that forms in his stomach every time he considers accepting the higher paying offer. He decides to choose the job that pays less. Two months later, he is relieved that he chose the right offer as the higher paying company went out of business due to a high profile lawsuit.
    I hope you now have a good idea of how the gut instinct operates!

Signs You’ve Experienced a Gut Instinct

Pay attention to these signs:

  • A sudden feeling of dread or fear (that is out of context)
  • A strong urge to do something (feels like an inner nudge or pull)
  • Full-body chills, goosebumps or “tingles” up the spine
  • Nausea or physical uneasiness
  • Sudden hypervigilance (or being on “high alert”)
  • A clear and firm voice within you instructing you to do/not do something

You might experience all of these signs at once or only one or two of them.

Is it Fear? Or is it Your Gut Instinct?

Don’t get them confused!

But also, don’t worry if you have already. Chances are you were never taught about the difference between superficial mental fears and true gut instinct.

The mind can easily fool us, particularly when it comes to gut instinct. After all, we feel our emotions within our body. When you’re scared, you most likely get clammy hands, butterflies, and an increase in heart rate, right?

In a similar fashion, when we experience a gut instinct, we also receive physical sensations.

So how on earth can we distinguish between the two?

My response is to pay attention to your mind. What is the quality of your thoughts? Is your mind racing, frantic, or chaotic? If so, you are experiencing fear.

On the other hand, if your mind is relatively neutral, but your body is experiencing strong reactions (like a sense of impending doom for instance), you are experiencing a gut instinct.

In other words, when you need to distinguish between the voice of fear and your gut instincts, always turn your attention to your mind.

Why?

Gut instincts are spontaneous — they arise out of the blue. They don’t have time to build-up in the brain, therefore, the brain is relatively still and neutral. There is no “hmm, should I? Shouldn’t I?” going on. There is just an immediate DO THIS/DON’T DO THIS.

Fears, on the other hand, build-up. They are typically more vague, nagging, unclear, and tumultuous. If your mind is spinning, if your thoughts are everywhere, you are experiencing fear, not gut instinct.

7 Gut Instincts You Should NEVER Ignore

Obviously, you must be the judge. But there are some situations in life where your gut instincts shine the most.

While it’s easy to brush off most nagging sensations, please never ignore the following ones:

1. “I’m in danger”

Remember that your gut instincts reflect what your subconscious mind already knows. Although you may not be able to pinpoint what exactly the danger is, please listen to this inner warning. It could be the difference between life and death.

2. “They’re in danger”

Yes, you might sound like a lunatic. Yes, you might feel embarrassed or perplexed. But if you genuinely feel that someone is in danger, tell them. You have nothing to lose. You might just prevent the person from making a big mistake or endangering themselves.

3. “This isn’t the right choice”

If you get a strong and clear feeling that what you’re doing isn’t right, pay attention. Even if there is no moral or logical reason why you should be feeling that way, take heed.

4. “I need help”

Your gut instinct doesn’t only warn you of danger, it also helps to preserve your emotional wellbeing. If you receive a strong sensation that you need help (whether physically, emotionally, mentally or spiritually), seek it out. Don’t linger.

5. “I need to help them”

At some point in our lives, the overwhelming desire to help someone will arise. There may not be any rational reason why. The other person may appear to be perfectly fine on the surface. But don’t let appearances deceive you. Have a conversation with the person. Ask them how they are. This might make you feel vulnerable or uncomfortable, but you will at the very least make the person feel special, and at the most potentially save their lives.

6. “Something feels off in my body”

Unless you’re a hypochondriac (which is unlikely), your gut instincts rarely lie about the state of your health. If a sudden strong and clear desire arises to see a medical professional, do it. Get a full health assessment, and even if nothing comes up, feel proud of yourself for practicing self-care.

7. “This is it!”

Often when the perfect life calling, spiritual path, job, house, decision, option, etc. comes along, your gut instinct will immediately notify you. If you receive a strong and clear feeling that practically screams “YES” don’t ignore it! This is one of the most important reasons why it’s essential to listen to your gut instinct. It could be the difference between making a life-fulfilling choice and a soul-starving decision.

Trust Your Gut

So long as you’re able to distinguish between the voice of fear and the spontaneous feelings of your gut instinct, it is safe to trust your gut.

Trusting your instincts is an invaluable life skill and one that will tremendously benefit you on the spiritual path. After all, this instinct is built into our very DNA, so why not make the most use out of it?

As a final recommendation, I suggest practicing mindfulness meditation if you struggle to trust your gut. Mindfulness meditation will help you to become aware of your thoughts and body sensations. The more awareness you can develop, the easier it will be to make the distinction — it will become second-nature to you.

 

~via LonerWolf.com

PERCEPTION FOR THE DAY ~ Denise Le Fay: “Pathpaving & The Separation Of Worlds”

“When people cannot honestly tell the difference between Light and Dark, Dark and Light, but claim they know all sorts of things, people, beings, aliens, situations, religious beliefs and reality, they cannot energetically discern their backsides from holes in the ground! They think they know what’s going on but they don’t overall and they believe the rest of us don’t know either but we do and many of us always have. Also I have to say that anyone who believes that wannabe dictator narcissist psychopath Orange Menace Trump is an improvement over previous red and blue political psychopaths is in for some huge revelations. Screaming ‘fake news’ endlessly does not justify a lifetime of corruption, negativity and mental and emotional instability. Corrupt and unstable is corrupt and unstable whether coming from a politician, real estate investor, con man or any other patriarchal profession.”

~Denise Le Fay 

 

~via https://highheartlife.com/2018/11/10/pathpaving-the-separation-of-worlds/

BARRIE DAVENPORT: “Sensing Vs. Intuition: How Do You Perceive Your World?”

I once managed a resort that provided courses in Myers-Briggs studies to better understand employees and guests. I loved that and learned a lot about people. (I’m an INFP) 🙂

If you have taken a Myers-Briggs personality test, you know that there are dominant personality traits all people have, while other traits are more subdued.

The Myers-Briggs type indicator has four personality dichotomies that comprise one’s personality. Your personality type is often reflected as a series of four letters.

The four dichotomies include:

Your favorite world: Do you tend to focus on the outer world or more on your own inner world? This is called Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I).

Information Gathering: Do you focus on the basic information you take in with your senses, or do you prefer to interpret and add meaning? This is called Sensing (S) or Intuition (N).

Decision-Making: When making decisions, do you prefer to first use logic and consistency or first consider people and special circumstances? This is called Thinking (T) or Feeling (F).

Structure Preference: In dealing with the outside world, do you prefer to get things decided or do you prefer to stay open to new information and options? This is called Judging (J) or Perceiving (P).

The letters for these four dichotomies can combine in 16 different ways, depending on your personality type. For example, I’m an INFJ (introvert, intuitive, feeling, judging).

In this post, I’m going to focus on Sensing vs. Intuition — whether you prefer to collect and process new information either through your five senses or in more, imaginative and abstract ways.

  • Personality Traits: Sensing Vs. Intuition

Everyone uses Sensing and Intuition to process information. One of them is likely more natural for you, and you are more comfortable using it, while the other may be a bit more uncomfortable, but you still it on a daily basis.

It is more common to have a Sensing personality trait than an Intuitive one, as almost 75% of people identify themselves as being Sensors. When it comes to Sensing vs. Intuition, do you know which preference you have?

Carl Jung was the first to develop a theory that everyone has a psychological type. The two different functions he believed humans use in their lives were how people perceive information and how they make decisions.

He believed that there were two opposite ways of functioning within these boundaries. According to Jung, each psychological trait is on a spectrum, meaning that everyone uses these function at varying amounts, and each person develops an order of preference for the functions.

Jung believed one’s dominant function was so powerful that it took over any other personality types that person had.

There are eight sensing personality types and 8 intuitive types.

The sensing personality types include:

ISTJ- Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging (the assessor)

These people are quiet and serious. They often become successful because they are thorough, responsible, and dependable.

ISTJs are also practical, matter-of-fact, and realistic with their ideas. They use logic to make decisions and work toward their goals without becoming easily distracted.

ISTJs appreciate organization and value loyalty and traditions.

ISFJ- Introversion, Sensing, Feeling, Judging (the guardian)

ISFJ’s are quiet, cordial, responsible, and dedicated. They consistently meet their deadlines and produce accurate and thorough work.

They are loyal people who are able to remember specific details about people who they find to be important. They thrive in a neat and harmonious environment.

ISTP- Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Perceiving (the expert)

ISTPs are logical, tolerant, and flexible. They love to be efficient in their work and get through all of the unnecessary information to find exactly what they need.

They do not like to waste time or deal with things that will not help them reach their ultimate goal.

They are quiet observers but act quickly to find solutions to problems that may come up. They love to figure out how things work, especially when it comes to cause and effect.

ISFP- Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Perceiving (the creator)

ISFPs are quiet, nice, and sensitive. They tend to live in the moment and only pay attention to what is going on around them.

ISFPs prefer to work in their own space and at their own pace. They are committed to their values and their loved ones.

ISFPs are uncomfortable with disagreements and conflicts and do their best to avoid these situations.

ESTP- Extraversion, Sensing, Thinking, Perceiving (the convincer)

ESTPs are flexible and tolerant and take a sensible approach to achieve immediate results.

They are not interested in theories or concepts, rather they prefer to use facts to be proactive in solving problems.

ESTFs tend to live in the here and now and may act spontaneously to enjoy the moments they have with other people.

In fact, people with this personality type often try to get other people to be spontaneous along with them.

ESFP- Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling, Perceiving (the entertainer)

ESFPs are outgoing and accepting of other people. They do not discriminate and they see everyone as an equal.

They easily adapt to new people and environments. ESFPs have a great love for life and material comforts.

They love to have fun while working in teams or groups and they often bring a realistic approach to any project. ESFPs learn best by trying new things with other people.

ESFJ- Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling, Judging (the advocate)

This person is warm-hearted, diligent, and cooperative. They appreciate living in harmony and work very hard to establish this environment.

They also believe that all people are equal and do not discriminate against people who are different from them in any way.

ESFJs prefer to work in groups and get multiple perspectives in order to finish tasks accurately and efficiently.

They follow through with all of their promises and want to be appreciated for their contributions. ESFJs are also attuned to the needs of other people and try to meet those needs.

ESTJ- Extraversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging (the supervisor)

ESTJs are practical, realistic, and tell it like it is. They can make decisions quickly, implement their plans, and achieve results efficiently.

They can clearly define their logical standards and expect others to systematically follow them. They are great leaders and are often in supervisor or captain positions in their careers.

The intuition personality types include:

INFJ- Introversion, Intuition, Feeling, Judging (the best friend)

INFJ personality types look for the meaning and connection in their ideas, relationships, and even their material possessions.

They want to be able to understand what motivates people. They are very committed to their values and create a clear vision for working toward the common good.

INFJs are great people to confide in because they will listen and try to help others find solutions to their problems.

INTJ– Introversion, Intuition, Thinking, Judging (the planner)

INTJs are able to come up with innovative ideas and they love to figure out how they can implement these ideas.

They are able to easily pick up on patterns with external events and come up with long-range explanations.

INTJs are skeptical and independent and maintain high standards of competence and performance.

INFP- Introversion, Intuition, Feeling, Perceiving (the idealist)

INFPs are strategic and loyal to what they believe in. They want to live their lives parallel with their values and are accepting of other people unless their values are being threatened.

They have a sense of curiosity and they can come up with possibilities of solutions to problems quickly. They want to understand people and to help others fulfill their potential.

INTP– Introversion, Intuition, Thinking, Perceiving (the engineer)

INTPs look for logical explanations for problems and analyze the things that they are interested in.

They think in a theoretical way, which makes them more interested in ideas than in socializing.

INTPs are quiet and contained, but they are flexible and adapt easily to new situations. They are able to pay strict attention to the problem at hand if it piques their interest.

ENFP– Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, Perceiving (the supporter)

ENFPs are enthusiastic and imaginative and they love to improvise. They enjoy exploring the different possibilities in life and they are able to connect events and information very quickly.

While they do enjoy receiving affirmation from others, ENFPs are confident in their work and they often give appreciation and support to other people when they see a job well done.

ENTP– Extraversion, Intuition, Thinking, Perceiving (the inventor)

ENTPs are able to think on their feet and they’re very smart, vigilant, and outspoken. They are quick to use their resources to solve new and difficult problems.

They think about new possibilities and are then able to analyze their ideas in a strategic way. ENTPs are good at reading other people and are quick to jump from one task to another.

ENTJ– Extraversion, Intuition, Thinking, Judging (the chief)

These decisive leaders tell it how it is. They are quick to point out illogical or inefficient procedures and policies and develop new comprehensive systems to solve problems within an organization.

ENTJs enjoy long-term planning, goal setting, and the consistent pursuit of knowledge. They are both well-informed and well-read and love passing their knowledge onto other people.

ENFJ– Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, Judging (the instructor)

ENFJs are warm, sociable, empathetic people who hold a high level of responsibility. They are often mentors and easily pick up on the needs and motivations of other people.

They are able to see the potential in everyone. This group often initiates individual and group growth, which makes them great group facilitators.

ENFJs are responsive to both praise and criticism.

Why do you need to know your personality type?

There are several reasons why it is important to know and understand your personality type. First, it will help you realize that other people are not necessarily wrong, they are just different.

If you are the sensing type and someone you work with is more intuitive, you may be interested in only the facts of a case, while your partner is more interested in the patterns and possibilities. If you know this, you will be more equipped to work with this person.

Knowing your personality type will also help you manage your daily routine better. When you understand what you need in order to do your best work, you can structure your days in a specific way to maximize your success.

You will also be able to manage your energy better. If you can recognize what makes you thrive and what exhausts you, you can plan ahead of time so your energy is available to you when you really need it.

This can certainly impact your life because you can make sure that you have the energy that you need when you are at work and you can set aside some quiet time after work to recharge if that is what your mind and body want.

When it comes to Sensing vs. Intuition, these criteria represent the method by which people perceive information. Knowing this about yourself will help you pinpoint your most effective learning style.

Intuitive Personality

If you favor intuition, it means you pay the most attention to the meaning and patterns of messages that you receive.

Intuitive people prefer to learn by working a problem through in their head instead of engaging in a hands-on experience.

Intuitive people are always interested in learning new things and looking for possibilities that have not yet been uncovered. These people think more about the future than the past and they like to work with abstract theories.

People who are intuitive remember past events as a general idea of what something was like rather than the facts and details of the event.

  • Mainly believes information he/she receives from the imaginative world
  • Visionary and future-oriented
  • Perceives things based on their understanding of the world
  • Focused on meanings
  • Often more interested in the future than the present
  • Described as being “creative” 

Sensing Personality

According to the Myers Briggs test, you may lean more toward the Sensing personality if you often pay attention to physical reality — what you see, hear, touch, taste, and smell.

People in this category are more concerned with things that are authentic, present, current, and true.

Sensing people often notice facts and recall details that they think are important. They like to use practical ideas, and they are able to learn the best when they can see how to use what they are learning.

This means that hands-on experiences make a larger impact than words or lectures.

  • Relies on concrete, true information
  • Focused on the present and past
  • Mainly believes information that he/she receives from the external world
  • Hands-on learners
  • Often described as “practical” and “literal”
  • Neither the Sensing nor the Intuitive preference is better than the other.

Both types have strengths and weakness, and both are necessary for society to function optimally.

We need the visionaries and idealists, and we need those whose feet are firmly planted on the ground.

Understanding whether or not you lean more toward a sensing or intuitive preference will help you better understand yourself and make decisions and choices that support your natural type.

Do you think you are more of a sensing person or do you lean more toward intuition? You can find out more by visiting the Myers-Briggs site and taking a personality assessment:

https://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/home.htm?bhcp=1

 

 

~via LiveBoldAndBloom.com