PERCEPTION FOR THE DAY ~ Denise Le Fay: “Pathpaving & The Separation Of Worlds”

“When people cannot honestly tell the difference between Light and Dark, Dark and Light, but claim they know all sorts of things, people, beings, aliens, situations, religious beliefs and reality, they cannot energetically discern their backsides from holes in the ground! They think they know what’s going on but they don’t overall and they believe the rest of us don’t know either but we do and many of us always have. Also I have to say that anyone who believes that wannabe dictator narcissist psychopath Orange Menace Trump is an improvement over previous red and blue political psychopaths is in for some huge revelations. Screaming ‘fake news’ endlessly does not justify a lifetime of corruption, negativity and mental and emotional instability. Corrupt and unstable is corrupt and unstable whether coming from a politician, real estate investor, con man or any other patriarchal profession.”

~Denise Le Fay 

 

~via https://highheartlife.com/2018/11/10/pathpaving-the-separation-of-worlds/

Advertisements

BARRIE DAVENPORT: “Sensing Vs. Intuition: How Do You Perceive Your World?”

I once managed a resort that provided courses in Myers-Briggs studies to better understand employees and guests. I loved that and learned a lot about people. (I’m an INFP) 🙂

If you have taken a Myers-Briggs personality test, you know that there are dominant personality traits all people have, while other traits are more subdued.

The Myers-Briggs type indicator has four personality dichotomies that comprise one’s personality. Your personality type is often reflected as a series of four letters.

The four dichotomies include:

Your favorite world: Do you tend to focus on the outer world or more on your own inner world? This is called Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I).

Information Gathering: Do you focus on the basic information you take in with your senses, or do you prefer to interpret and add meaning? This is called Sensing (S) or Intuition (N).

Decision-Making: When making decisions, do you prefer to first use logic and consistency or first consider people and special circumstances? This is called Thinking (T) or Feeling (F).

Structure Preference: In dealing with the outside world, do you prefer to get things decided or do you prefer to stay open to new information and options? This is called Judging (J) or Perceiving (P).

The letters for these four dichotomies can combine in 16 different ways, depending on your personality type. For example, I’m an INFJ (introvert, intuitive, feeling, judging).

In this post, I’m going to focus on Sensing vs. Intuition — whether you prefer to collect and process new information either through your five senses or in more, imaginative and abstract ways.

  • Personality Traits: Sensing Vs. Intuition

Everyone uses Sensing and Intuition to process information. One of them is likely more natural for you, and you are more comfortable using it, while the other may be a bit more uncomfortable, but you still it on a daily basis.

It is more common to have a Sensing personality trait than an Intuitive one, as almost 75% of people identify themselves as being Sensors. When it comes to Sensing vs. Intuition, do you know which preference you have?

Carl Jung was the first to develop a theory that everyone has a psychological type. The two different functions he believed humans use in their lives were how people perceive information and how they make decisions.

He believed that there were two opposite ways of functioning within these boundaries. According to Jung, each psychological trait is on a spectrum, meaning that everyone uses these function at varying amounts, and each person develops an order of preference for the functions.

Jung believed one’s dominant function was so powerful that it took over any other personality types that person had.

There are eight sensing personality types and 8 intuitive types.

The sensing personality types include:

ISTJ- Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging (the assessor)

These people are quiet and serious. They often become successful because they are thorough, responsible, and dependable.

ISTJs are also practical, matter-of-fact, and realistic with their ideas. They use logic to make decisions and work toward their goals without becoming easily distracted.

ISTJs appreciate organization and value loyalty and traditions.

ISFJ- Introversion, Sensing, Feeling, Judging (the guardian)

ISFJ’s are quiet, cordial, responsible, and dedicated. They consistently meet their deadlines and produce accurate and thorough work.

They are loyal people who are able to remember specific details about people who they find to be important. They thrive in a neat and harmonious environment.

ISTP- Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Perceiving (the expert)

ISTPs are logical, tolerant, and flexible. They love to be efficient in their work and get through all of the unnecessary information to find exactly what they need.

They do not like to waste time or deal with things that will not help them reach their ultimate goal.

They are quiet observers but act quickly to find solutions to problems that may come up. They love to figure out how things work, especially when it comes to cause and effect.

ISFP- Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Perceiving (the creator)

ISFPs are quiet, nice, and sensitive. They tend to live in the moment and only pay attention to what is going on around them.

ISFPs prefer to work in their own space and at their own pace. They are committed to their values and their loved ones.

ISFPs are uncomfortable with disagreements and conflicts and do their best to avoid these situations.

ESTP- Extraversion, Sensing, Thinking, Perceiving (the convincer)

ESTPs are flexible and tolerant and take a sensible approach to achieve immediate results.

They are not interested in theories or concepts, rather they prefer to use facts to be proactive in solving problems.

ESTFs tend to live in the here and now and may act spontaneously to enjoy the moments they have with other people.

In fact, people with this personality type often try to get other people to be spontaneous along with them.

ESFP- Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling, Perceiving (the entertainer)

ESFPs are outgoing and accepting of other people. They do not discriminate and they see everyone as an equal.

They easily adapt to new people and environments. ESFPs have a great love for life and material comforts.

They love to have fun while working in teams or groups and they often bring a realistic approach to any project. ESFPs learn best by trying new things with other people.

ESFJ- Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling, Judging (the advocate)

This person is warm-hearted, diligent, and cooperative. They appreciate living in harmony and work very hard to establish this environment.

They also believe that all people are equal and do not discriminate against people who are different from them in any way.

ESFJs prefer to work in groups and get multiple perspectives in order to finish tasks accurately and efficiently.

They follow through with all of their promises and want to be appreciated for their contributions. ESFJs are also attuned to the needs of other people and try to meet those needs.

ESTJ- Extraversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging (the supervisor)

ESTJs are practical, realistic, and tell it like it is. They can make decisions quickly, implement their plans, and achieve results efficiently.

They can clearly define their logical standards and expect others to systematically follow them. They are great leaders and are often in supervisor or captain positions in their careers.

The intuition personality types include:

INFJ- Introversion, Intuition, Feeling, Judging (the best friend)

INFJ personality types look for the meaning and connection in their ideas, relationships, and even their material possessions.

They want to be able to understand what motivates people. They are very committed to their values and create a clear vision for working toward the common good.

INFJs are great people to confide in because they will listen and try to help others find solutions to their problems.

INTJ– Introversion, Intuition, Thinking, Judging (the planner)

INTJs are able to come up with innovative ideas and they love to figure out how they can implement these ideas.

They are able to easily pick up on patterns with external events and come up with long-range explanations.

INTJs are skeptical and independent and maintain high standards of competence and performance.

INFP- Introversion, Intuition, Feeling, Perceiving (the idealist)

INFPs are strategic and loyal to what they believe in. They want to live their lives parallel with their values and are accepting of other people unless their values are being threatened.

They have a sense of curiosity and they can come up with possibilities of solutions to problems quickly. They want to understand people and to help others fulfill their potential.

INTP– Introversion, Intuition, Thinking, Perceiving (the engineer)

INTPs look for logical explanations for problems and analyze the things that they are interested in.

They think in a theoretical way, which makes them more interested in ideas than in socializing.

INTPs are quiet and contained, but they are flexible and adapt easily to new situations. They are able to pay strict attention to the problem at hand if it piques their interest.

ENFP– Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, Perceiving (the supporter)

ENFPs are enthusiastic and imaginative and they love to improvise. They enjoy exploring the different possibilities in life and they are able to connect events and information very quickly.

While they do enjoy receiving affirmation from others, ENFPs are confident in their work and they often give appreciation and support to other people when they see a job well done.

ENTP– Extraversion, Intuition, Thinking, Perceiving (the inventor)

ENTPs are able to think on their feet and they’re very smart, vigilant, and outspoken. They are quick to use their resources to solve new and difficult problems.

They think about new possibilities and are then able to analyze their ideas in a strategic way. ENTPs are good at reading other people and are quick to jump from one task to another.

ENTJ– Extraversion, Intuition, Thinking, Judging (the chief)

These decisive leaders tell it how it is. They are quick to point out illogical or inefficient procedures and policies and develop new comprehensive systems to solve problems within an organization.

ENTJs enjoy long-term planning, goal setting, and the consistent pursuit of knowledge. They are both well-informed and well-read and love passing their knowledge onto other people.

ENFJ– Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, Judging (the instructor)

ENFJs are warm, sociable, empathetic people who hold a high level of responsibility. They are often mentors and easily pick up on the needs and motivations of other people.

They are able to see the potential in everyone. This group often initiates individual and group growth, which makes them great group facilitators.

ENFJs are responsive to both praise and criticism.

Why do you need to know your personality type?

There are several reasons why it is important to know and understand your personality type. First, it will help you realize that other people are not necessarily wrong, they are just different.

If you are the sensing type and someone you work with is more intuitive, you may be interested in only the facts of a case, while your partner is more interested in the patterns and possibilities. If you know this, you will be more equipped to work with this person.

Knowing your personality type will also help you manage your daily routine better. When you understand what you need in order to do your best work, you can structure your days in a specific way to maximize your success.

You will also be able to manage your energy better. If you can recognize what makes you thrive and what exhausts you, you can plan ahead of time so your energy is available to you when you really need it.

This can certainly impact your life because you can make sure that you have the energy that you need when you are at work and you can set aside some quiet time after work to recharge if that is what your mind and body want.

When it comes to Sensing vs. Intuition, these criteria represent the method by which people perceive information. Knowing this about yourself will help you pinpoint your most effective learning style.

Intuitive Personality

If you favor intuition, it means you pay the most attention to the meaning and patterns of messages that you receive.

Intuitive people prefer to learn by working a problem through in their head instead of engaging in a hands-on experience.

Intuitive people are always interested in learning new things and looking for possibilities that have not yet been uncovered. These people think more about the future than the past and they like to work with abstract theories.

People who are intuitive remember past events as a general idea of what something was like rather than the facts and details of the event.

  • Mainly believes information he/she receives from the imaginative world
  • Visionary and future-oriented
  • Perceives things based on their understanding of the world
  • Focused on meanings
  • Often more interested in the future than the present
  • Described as being “creative” 

Sensing Personality

According to the Myers Briggs test, you may lean more toward the Sensing personality if you often pay attention to physical reality — what you see, hear, touch, taste, and smell.

People in this category are more concerned with things that are authentic, present, current, and true.

Sensing people often notice facts and recall details that they think are important. They like to use practical ideas, and they are able to learn the best when they can see how to use what they are learning.

This means that hands-on experiences make a larger impact than words or lectures.

  • Relies on concrete, true information
  • Focused on the present and past
  • Mainly believes information that he/she receives from the external world
  • Hands-on learners
  • Often described as “practical” and “literal”
  • Neither the Sensing nor the Intuitive preference is better than the other.

Both types have strengths and weakness, and both are necessary for society to function optimally.

We need the visionaries and idealists, and we need those whose feet are firmly planted on the ground.

Understanding whether or not you lean more toward a sensing or intuitive preference will help you better understand yourself and make decisions and choices that support your natural type.

Do you think you are more of a sensing person or do you lean more toward intuition? You can find out more by visiting the Myers-Briggs site and taking a personality assessment:

https://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/home.htm?bhcp=1

 

 

~via LiveBoldAndBloom.com

PERCEPTIONS TO PONDER ~ Lisa Renee on ‘The New Age Astral Junkie’

“Over the years, it has been interesting to note a pattern surface in the new age rainbow type of person that can get really offended so easily, when it would seem logical if they really did identify with love and light, they would be all about propagating love and kindness towards others. Most of it is a facade. Some of the most cruel and unstable people I’ve encountered over the years, are those that subscribe to the new age bliss out pill, complete with fake smiles and flowery words. No one wants the hidden wrath of a new age astral junkie when you confront their beliefs!”

~Lisa Renee

 

~via https://energeticsynthesis.com/index.php/resource-tools/blog-timeline-shift/3333-taking-offense

LISA RENEE (Time Shift Blog): “People Taking Offense”

“Since people with narcissism have distorted views of themselves, they tend to perceive any positive interactions as expected and any negative interactions as personal attacks. They are particularly sensitive to perceived negative attacks because they live in a pseudo-reality or delusional state about themselves in relation to others. They may genuinely believe they are superior to others, so when positive reactions come their way they may take them for granted.”

~ Sharie Stines, PsyD

 

The Epidemic of People Taking Offense, While Tolerating Abusive Behavior as Okay

Dear ES Family,

The title of this article has been like wildfire in my inbox and has been increasingly observed in the social media landscape for many years now. Many people are taking offense and getting offended over minutiae, splitting hairs and getting really angry over nothing, while they ignore much larger issues that they actually should be concerned about. With this in mind, seeing this pattern escalate into epidemic proportions in the worldscape, this article is dedicated to the discussion of what it means when you are feeling offended, or when others get angry because they are offended at someone or something. When people are offended, it means their ego got bent out of shape when there was a disagreement and they did not get what they wanted. Many people get angry as a means of attempting to exert control over a person or situation. Maybe they didn’t like the way something or someone responded to them, or the way a particular situation is being expressed or represented.

I notice that most people get offended by what they imagined to be happening, rather than the actual event and taking the time needed to get more accurate information for a factual understanding to verify what really happened. Usually the person is angry about something that never happened to begin with, they imagined something in their mind or misunderstood the message and they remain offended while perpetuating the narrative of their personal delusion. It is quite unnerving at times to observe this unstable behavior in action, because it feels like a severe breakdown in treating others with respect and human courtesy, along with a rapid digression of critical thinking, mental clarity and balanced perception. The inability to see beyond a tiny slice of information, from which a personal interpretation or bias has been gathered from the limited lens of negative ego and the acquired 3D fractured belief systems.

Over the years, it has been interesting to note a pattern surface in the new age rainbow type of person that can get really offended so easily, when it would seem logical if they really did identify with love and light, they would be all about propagating love and kindness towards others. Most of it is a facade. Some of the most cruel and unstable people I’ve encountered over the years, are those that subscribe to the new age bliss out pill, complete with fake smiles and flowery words. No one wants the hidden wrath of a new age astral junkie when you confront their beliefs!

  • Take offense (at) (something)
  • To be or feel insulted, offended, or humiliated by something.
  • Take offense (at someone or something) to be insulted by someone or something.
  • Feel resentment or emotional pain, as in I didn’t realize he’d take offense when he wasn’t invited.

For many people, the tendency to take offense at little things is rooted in a false perspective of security in what the negative ego has created as the nature of the outer reality, according to that person’s belief system and mental perceptions. When that sense of reality or personal expectations are not met in the way that they wanted it to be, the ego gets offended and angry. We can see that this type of behavior has been increasing in the millennial or digital generation, in which the derogatory term, snowflake has been used to describe. The slang term snowflake may include a person perceived by others to have an inflated sense of uniqueness or an unwarranted sense of entitlement, or to be over-emotional, easily offended, and unable to deal with opposing opinions. Common usages include the terms special snowflake, generation snowflake, and snowflake that are commonly used as a politicized insult.

The term “snowflake generation” was one of Collins Dictionary’s 2016 words of the year. This tells us things are changing in the social landscape in the US. Collins defines the term as the young adults of the 2010s, viewed as being less resilient and more prone to taking offense than previous generations. The terms generation snowflake and snowflake generation are frequently used in reference to trigger warnings and safe spaces, or to describe young adults as “anti-free speech”, specifically in reference to a practice referred to as “no-platforming”. The term has also been used to refer to a reported increase in mental health issues among young adults.

All people would like to have a sense of personal security and safety; most people prefer to have the good opinion of others and want to feel that they belong. In our society, we tend to secure those good opinions with outer performance and images that are not always based in the truth, but of the false persona that we show to others in order to be accepted and belong. This need to belong somewhere informs what we do, how we speak, how we dress, how we express ourselves in our world and present oursleves to others.

When our security is based on our outer performance and image, we may feel threatened when someone expresses something that is perceived to be negative or unflattering about us. The undisciplined unconscious and conscious mind reaction to that threat is to take offense or become angry. Even a casual, flippant, or offhand remark can gnaw at us and steal our peace. The way to prevent taking offense is to address our desire for personal security, which comes from self awareness and building the core authentic self. As long as feelings of security are rooted in our negative ego and false self, the tendency to take offense, even at the little things, will exist. If, however, our feelings of security are not rooted in the negative ego’s perception of our outer performance and outer image, our perspective will change and our responses to the actions and comments of others will become much more balanced. We gain incredible strength when unconditional love is reborn as our new unifying principle, our true core self’s spiritual power and human dignity surfaces, and we are no longer shattered and overwhelmed by life’s circumstances.

Now let’s add another ingredient of severe ego distortion that results in narcissism where the perceived offense takes on wrath and rage. These people take getting offended to another level, which can show up with the f bombs and other choice words from random people becoming unhinged. Clearly, as spiritual catalysts we are triggering random people more often, and the NAA have been sending out the dark portals for assorted levels of harassment. Still it is obvious if one watches a youtube or comes into contact with social media, the insults, expletives, and character defamation tactics has gone to an entirely new level for public consumption. The subconscious content of the masses is spewing out to the surface for all of us to witness.

This is a good article.

How a Person with Narcissism Responds to a Perceived Offense
March 9, 2017 • By Sharie Stines, PsyD

Many people are simply not educated on the concept of the “narcissistic wound,” also known as the narcissistic injury, and are in for a wrath beyond comprehension when they offend a person with narcissism.

When offended, a typical person might experience hurt feelings or feel insulted or angry. However, the offended person might ultimately talk it through with the individual who committed the transgression, with a willingness to repair the relationship and move on. This can take time.

In general, bonds are developed and strengthened through the process of “rupture and repair.” People learn to handle insecurities in a relationship by building trust over time as they see each rupture or conflict in the relationship eventually leads to a deeper connection or repair.

Not so in the narcissistic relationship. Offending a person with narcissism can lead to immediate, lasting, and perhaps irreparable fallout.

When dealing with a person with narcissism, the rules are different. This is true in all aspects of the relationship, but for this article, the focus is on the narcissistic wound. These types of wounds are unlike other types of interpersonal ruptures. These differences are listed below:

Typical Rupture Themes:

*Hurt feelings
*Reaction tends to better match the perception of offense
*May result in anger
*May take time to repair
*Is eventually resolved
*Normal
*Offended person may react with anger, withdrawal, or repairable retaliation

Narcissistic Wound Themes:

*Shame attack
*Extreme overreaction
*Results in rage
*Causes existential threat to relationship
*Is never resolved
*Pathological
*Dr. Jekyll becomes Mr. Hyde
*Person with narcissism reacts with punishment, banishment, devaluing, or discarding of offender

Since people with narcissism have distorted views of themselves, they tend to perceive any positive interactions as expected and any negative interactions as personal attacks. They are particularly sensitive to perceived negative attacks because they live in a pseudo-reality or delusional state about themselves in relation to others. They may genuinely believe they are superior to others, so when positive reactions come their way they may take them for granted.

People with narcissism generally feel an inner emptiness and thus need positive input from others in order to maintain their delusional sense of reality. When anyone contradicts their fantasy views of themselves, they get close to those unbearable empty feelings and react strongly in order to stop their impending sense of inadequacy.

People with narcissism tend to have a chronic inner rage. Most people experience anger, usually a response to a perceived threat of some kind. Anger helps us realize when we need to take action, and quickly. Usually when people are angry, they temporarily suspend their cognitive functioning and empathy to a large degree and tend to operate in immediate terms.

Since they are continually full of rage (the flip side of their internal shame), people with narcissism may use any slight as an excuse to release some of the pressure of this inner rage/shame struggle. article – http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/how-person-with…ived-offense-0309174

With the ongoing dedication to clearing negative ego and emotional distortions in the pain body, we must learn to inherently place value on our own self worth, and to be responsible to own our emotional triggers. We also must know how to set healthy boundaries and be able to let things that bother us go. In the times we live, it is a critical survival tool to learn how to let it go and not let hurtful or harmful words said by others, eat away at you inside, disturbing your inner peace.

Being easily offended is a habit that we all can overcome. It usually indicates poor understanding of one’s own emotions in favor of the strategy of trying to change the behavior of others. But, since we’re all autonomous beings, we are only able to change ourselves, this includes how we understand and react to the world around us. A commitment to changing oneself rather than trying to force the changes we want to see on others, is a valuable choice that requires humility and open-mindedness. Here is a productive article for Understanding the Emotions Behind Taking Offense.

https://m.wikihow.com/Keep-From-Being-So-Easily-Offended

I hope this is helpful in navigating these types of scenarios, which seem to be escalating in the outer landscape.

With a Loving Heart,

Lisa

(source: Wiki – Snowflake, Understanding Emotions Behind Taking Offense)

 

 

~via EnergeticSynthesis.com – Time Shift Blog – July 18, 2018

LIFE COACH CODE: “10 Most Common Flaws Of Thinking That Distort Your Reality”

Our mind takes a lot of energy to process all the operations it needs to process during the day.

That’s why it creates shortcuts and biases, to save as much energy as it can without losing it’s efficiency.

However, these biases skew our sense of reality and most of the time we take decisions based on a false reality.

There are over 200 known biases that the human mind makes and integrates within its way of thinking.

Here are the 10 most common biases we use daily to save mental energy and make quick decisions. You’ll get a sense of how flawed our perception of reality and reasoning are.

10 Most Common Flaws Of Thinking:

1. Filtering

You filter out all the positive aspects of a situation and magnify the negative details.

How to combat it?

Try to list out as many positive details about a particular situation you find to be negative.

2. Polarized Thinking

You see things as Black and White, Good or Bad, there is nothing in between. Either you are perfect or you are a failure.

How to combat it?

There are many shades between black and white. Understand that nothing in nature is an extreme, it’s just our position of seeing a particular thing that can give us this subjectivity. If something is not perfect doesn’t mean it’s garbage.

3. Overgeneralization

You come to a general conclusion based on a single incident or piece of evidence without further research.

How to combat it?

Ask yourself where your evidence came from, how trustworthy is the source of the evidence, and is there any other evidence to back this assumption. How likely is for this single instance to be a general repeating truth? Did it happen at least 3 times with the same conditions? Were there any instances you can think of where the same conditions applied but the incident didn’t happen?

4. Mind Reading

Without their saying so, you assume what people were thinking and feeling, or why they act the way they do. You think you know what people think about you.

How to combat it?

Even though we like it to be true, we can’t read other people’s minds. We can assume what they think based on subtle clues and body language, we can get really close, but we can’t literally read their minds. What we usually do is project our own thoughts and we assume what they would think. Even if we come close to what they were thinking we cannot possibly know what they felt and for what reason. It takes years to connect with someone to such level, and even then our assumptions are wrong most of the time.

5. Catastrophizing

You always expect the worst. When you notice or hear about a problem you start asking What Ifs, What If It Happened To You.

How to combat it?

Just because something happened somewhere it doesn’t mean it will happen to you. Think about how many people it will not happen to. What makes you so special?

6. Personalization

Thinking that everything people say or do is some kind of reaction to you. You compare to others trying to determine who is better looking, smarter, etc.

How to combat it?

What people care about the most is themselves. They are obsessed with their own insecurities and they really do not care that much about you. The one who cares most about you is yourself and that’s why you assume everyone around you do the same. How sure are you about your assumptions? Can you test them in some way?

7. Control Fallacies

If you feel externally controlled, you see yourself as helpless, a victim of fate. On the opposite side, feeling everything in your life is internally controlled by you makes you feel responsible for the pain and happiness of everyone around you.

How to combat it?

The only responsibility you really have in your life is yourself. Understand that there are things outside of your control. What’s within your control are your choices, and even your choices can’t make other people happy if they do not choose to make themselves happy.

8. Fallacy Of Fairness

You feel resentful because you think you know what’s fair but others do not agree with you.

How to combat it?

Others might not see through the same perspective as you do. Try to see through other people’s eyes. Why would they not agree with you? What would be their reasoning? Where is their mistake? Instead of harboring anger within yourself try to let them know why you think they are wrong and you are right. Try to converse on the topic and maybe you will see the flaw in your perception. Maybe they will see their flaw. Whatever you do, expressing your truth will give you clarity.

9. Blaming

You hold other people responsible for your pain.

How to combat it?

Even though others might have hurt you they are not responsible for your pain. They might be responsible for what happened but your pain is your responsibility to heal. They do not feel pain, you do. Unless you accept your responsibility you will not be able to heal yourself. It’s much better to heal yourself than to seek revenge, be selfish about this.

10. Should

You have a list of rules and commandments about how everyone should act. If someone breaks a rule it extremely angers you and if you violate a rule you feel guilty.

How to combat it?

Nobody knows the right way to live so why would you assume everyone should listen to you? Nobody is born with a guide book. Even though your rules might be created to reduce suffering, know that most often, when rules are followed blindly, it comes a time when they create more suffering than reduce it. Especially if these rules are forced unto someone. We all follow a different path to the truth. If some rules work for you does not mean they will work for anyone else. Have your boundaries, but let others be free in having their own. Think about how you would feel if others forced some rules you don’t agree with upon your way of living. How will these rules help others? Explain it to them, invite them to follow.

 

 

~via LifeCoachCode.com